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Monday, May 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of Teratogenicity of coniine, a nicotinic alkaloid from Conium maculatum (poison hemlock) found in the catalog.

Teratogenicity of coniine, a nicotinic alkaloid from Conium maculatum (poison hemlock)

Carol S. Forsyth

Teratogenicity of coniine, a nicotinic alkaloid from Conium maculatum (poison hemlock)

by Carol S. Forsyth

  • 333 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Conine -- Toxicology.,
  • Arthrogryposis -- Etiology.,
  • Animals -- Abnormalities -- Etiology.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Carol S. Forsyth.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination78 leaves, bound. :
    Number of Pages78
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15204191M

    Technical Abstract: Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and cleft palate. A pharmacodynamic.   Presumably due to its piperidine alkaloids, including coniine (most toxic alkaloid; 2-propylpiperidine), Conium maculatum is also teratogenic in several species, The major teratogenic outcome is arthrogryposis, presumably also due to nicotinic receptor blockade with subsequent decreased fetal movement [18].

      Both C. maculatum and Nicotina tabacum (also known as the tobacco plant) cause nicotinic acute toxic effects, as they contain nicotinic and nicotinic-like alkaloids [49]. Poison hemlock has been reported to induce symptoms of acute toxicity .   Abstract. Coniine is an optically active toxic piperidine alkaloid and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist found in poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L.).Coniine teratogenicity is hypothesized to be attributable to the binding, activation, and prolonged desensitization of fetal muscle-type nAChR, which results in the complete inhibition of fetal by:

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and by: Keeler RF. Coniine, a teratogenic principle from Conium maculatum producing congenital malformations in calves. Clin Toxicol Apr; 7 (2): [31] Keeler RF, Balls LD. Teratogenic effects in cattle of Conium maculatum and conium alkaloids and analogs. Clin Toxicol ; 12 (1): [32] CROMWELL BT.


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Teratogenicity of coniine, a nicotinic alkaloid from Conium maculatum (poison hemlock) by Carol S. Forsyth Download PDF EPUB FB2

Teratogenicity of Coniine, a Nicotinic Alkaloid from Conium maculatum (Poison Hemlock) Abstract approved: Coniine, an alkaloid from Conium maculatum, is a known teratogen in many domestic species with maternal ingestion resulting in arthrogryposis (twisted limbs) of the offspring.

Arthrogryposis is also a common teratogenic outcome in. Teratogenicity of coniine, a nicotinic alkaloid from Conium maculatum (poison hemlock)Author: Carol S. Forsyth. Coniine, a teratogenic principle from Conium maculatum producing a nicotinic alkaloid from Conium maculatum book malformations in calves.

Conium maculatum (poison hemlock) toxicosis in a flock of range turkeys. Abstract Coniine, an alkaloid from Conium maculatum (poison hemlock), has been shown to be teratogenic in livestock.

The major ter‐atogenic outcome is arthrogryposis, presumably due to nicotinic. Piperidine alkaloids are natural compounds isolable from Apiaceae family (e.g Conium maculatum). Coniine is a nicotinic antagonist, which disrupts the function of central nervous system.

Piperidine alkaloids are organic compounds containing saturated heterocyclic amine ring, i.e piperidine nucleus – a six membered ring consists of five methylene bridge (-CH 2 -) and one amine.

A novel toxic alkaloid from poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L., Apiaceae): identification, synthesis and antinociceptive activity, Food and Chemical Toxicology (), doi: / This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication.

As a. Coniine, a polyketide-derived alkaloid, is poisonous to humans and animals. It is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, which leads to inhibition of the nervous system, eventually causing.

Coniine refers to a poisonous chemical compound, an alkaloid present in and isolable from poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), where its presence has been a source of significant economic, medical, and historico-cultural interest; coniine is also produced by the yellow pitcher plant (Sarracenia flava), and fool's parsley (Aethusa cynapium).Boiling point: to °C ( to °F; to K).

Pharmacognosy and phytochemistry – ALKALOIDS – part 2 –Dr. YOUSEF ABUSAMRA Page 10 5. Conium Alkaloids ¾ T he unripe fruit of Conium maculatum (Hemlock)ÊØ ÷ å ­Ûíß ¾ It contains % of alkaloids. ¾ The most important is coniine. ¾ It is an oil. ¾ These alkaloids are very toxic.

ConiineFile Size: 3MB. Conium maculatumpoisoning occurs due to some of its piperidine alkaloid contents which have nicotinic effects, such as coniceine, coniine, N-methyl coniine, conhydrine, and pseudoconhydrine. While every part of the plant is toxic, the highest alkaloid concentration Cited by: 2.

Coniine is an optically active toxic piperidine alkaloid and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist found in poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L.). Coniine teratogenicity is hypothesized.

/conine/ is the extremely poisonous alkaloid which may be present to the extent of 2% in the leaves and unripe fruits /of conium maculatum, poison hemlock/.

Clarke, M. L., D. Harvey and D. Humphreys. piglets. That coniine has such teratogenic effects has been demonstrated in cattle" (Frohne and Pfander ).

Symptoms: Conium alkaloids are structurally related to nicotine and function similarly. "In addition to nicotinic activity, coniine also exhibits curare-like actions, and it paralyzes the. Technical Abstract: Coniine is an optically active toxic piperidine alkaloid and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist found in poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L.).

Coniine teratogenicity is hypothesized to be due to the binding, activation, and prolonged desensitization of fetal muscle-type nAChR which results in the complete. Coniine, an alkaloid from Conium maculatum (poison hemlock), has been shown to be teratogenic in livestock.

The major teratogenic outcome is arthrogryposis, presumably due to nicotinic receptor blockade. However, coniine has failed to produce arthrogryposis in rats or mice and is only weakly teratogenic in rabbits. Coniine, γ-coniceine and N-methylconiine block or reduce the response of muscle to acetylcholine due to alkaloid binding to the nicotinic receptor of neuromuscular cells [,].

Coniine also exerts inhibitory effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated nitrergic and noradrenergic transmitter response in rat anococcygeus muscle via the inhibition of presynaptic nAChR [ ].Cited by: 6. Alkaloid-containing plants have been used by humans since ancient times for therapeutic and recreational purposes.

For example, medicinal plants have been known in Mesopotamia from about BC. The Odyssey of Homer referred to a gift given to Helen by the Egyptian queen, a drug bringing oblivion. It is believed that the gift was an opium-containing drug.

Coniine c-Coniceine N-acetylhystrine Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors abstract Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and by: Conium maculatum is teratogenic in cattle, pigs, and sheep (Edmonds et al., ; Keeler, ; Keeler and Balls, ; Panter et al., a,b).

Coniine and gamma coniceine are the nicotine-like pyridine alkaloids that are considered the teratogenic agents (Burrows and Tyrl, ). Teratogenic Effects in Cattle of Conium maculatum and Conium Alkaloids and Analogs. Clinical Toxicology: Vol.

12, No. 1, pp. Cited by:. Coniine. Good to know. Coniine is a poisonous alkaloid. It is usually isolated from poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) and some other plant BC, Socrates, when he was sentenced to death, chose to die by drinking a coniine-containing mixture of poison hemlock.The exposure of a developing embryo or fetus to teratogenic alkaloids from plants has the potential to cause developmental defects in humans and animals due to the inhibition of fetal movement.

The Author: Benedict Green, Stephen Lee, Kevin Welch. Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and cleft palate.